Check out this video from our respected charity Spinal Cord Injury Ontario.


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VIDEO TRANSCRIPT

Nouma Hammash:
I was starting to take my first step as a child and then I started dragging my left leg and getting weak and didn’t want to walk or stand. And after running several investigations it was found out to be spinal muscular atrophy.

I had the challenge having physiotherapy constantly. I remember sometimes crying there, and I don’t want to go there. and even when I had to do my exercise at home, I was trying to run away from my father, from my mother, that I don’t want to do that.

Moving to the university itself was very difficult, because at school I was using a manual chair. At the university you have to move from one class to another, from one building to another, and I clearly remember the first day I came back home and I cried and cried and I said, what did I do to myself?

The biggest challenge, I would say, was employment. I applied to so many places and so many of them had just said no, because of my disability. I knew that very well.

So having this job, having some income, it’s emotionally and financially, it was very helpful.

Spinal Cord Injury Ontario was started after the Second World War. Several Canadian veterans came back with paraplegia and quadriplegia. They were expected to be institutionalised and they didn’t like that at all. They wanted to live the life that they chose, so they came together and they started this organisation.

So the services we provide are peer support, regional services, employment services, attendant services and now knowledge enterprise.

All of our services rely on donations we get from the Federated Health Charities. It’s very important to continue receiving donations, because this means that we continue to exist, and when we continue to exist, more and more people will receive the services and more and more people will be able to go back to their life after their injury.

Having a sudden injury is not easy, it’s a big transition in their lives. SCI Ontario provides a lot of support for people since acute phase, when they are in the hospital, until they get through the rehab, and then afterwards in their community, home, work, school, whatever.

So without those donors, I wouldn’t have got the services I got, I wouldn’t be in a job today. Maybe I would have been staying at home and still struggling here and there. Maybe I would be in a job where I would be taken advantage of and we know that this happens.

Spinal Cord Injury Ontario, receiving these donations from Federated Health Charities, means that people with disabilities are able to go back and lead normal lives.