<< Return to Gallery

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT

Sarah Wood:
When Federated Health Charities began in 1983, their first campaign raised around $40 000 for the one participating charity. Thirty five years later, we’re now raising funds for seventeen charities, raising around $2 million a year, with a grand total of just over $48 million given to these charities.

Tatyana Parfenyuk:
Knowing that my work makes a difference, makes me feel great, makes me feel that I accomplished something really meaningful.

Miranda Borisenko:
I continue to support Federated Health Charities, because health for all of us is important, and if we haven’t received support from the charities, we know somebody who has.

Gordana Skrba:
All the charities involved are actively involved with the campaign. It’s a collective effort, it’s a teamwork and we only hope that for many years we will be working together, and that the Federated Health Charities will be around to help us raise revenues for people that we work with and work for.

Bailey B:
If I hadn’t been part of Heart and Stroke, I would definitely not be where I am today. Heart and Stroke definitely celebrated my condition, which I had not done before. I was empowered, I became a better speaker. I wouldn’t be doing a master’s, and I don’t know where I’d be.

Matthew Maynard:
I think the important part was that we got together with other families, that we saw that, hey, we’re not alone. And I think that’s one of the big things that Hemophilia Ontario offers, is to say, hey, you’re not alone.
In many ways it’s the education, but I think the biggest part of it is the community.

Biljana Potkonjak:
One in four Canadians may have a liver disease. We try to advocate for equal access to treatment, for better understanding, to raise awareness of liver disease, and to fund medical research, which is really crucial.

Nancy Yarmel:
When we started the Cancer Society in 1938, the survival rate in the early forties was 25%. We’re now at a survival rate of 60, and some of the cancers is approaching 90% five-year survival rate. That’s the power of research.

Nouma Hammash:
Spinal Cord Injury Ontario receiving these donations from Federated Health Charities, means that people with disabilities are able to go back and lead normal lives.

Tracie Napoli:
We appreciate everyone’s contribution. But when somebody can donate so that we receive funds on a consistent basis, it helps us be able to plan for the needs that we have to meet.

Andy Donovan:
The money is crucial to continue to fund what we do, but also, it’s another channel for us to communicate our message out to the community, to a group that we wouldn’t normally be able to connect to.

Sarah Wood:
I would like to say to our donors, thank you. I can say with confidence that you’re not just changing people’s lives, you are saving lives. With the amount of money that we’ve invested into research, millions and millions of dollars, there are, without a doubt, better treatment outcomes and potential cures for these diseases, that would not have existed without this campaign.